Alice and MaryLou Clothiers
A look into the mind of a plus size, brown skinned, vintage loving, Portland living shop girl.
Alice and MaryLou Clothiers
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vintagegal:


Bo Diddley & The Duchess (AKA Norma-Jean Wofford)
One of the first female rock ‘n’ roll guitarists was a tall, stunning black woman with a towering bouffant hairdo, a skintight gold lame dress (or black leather pants), high heels, and a custom Gretsch electric guitar, designed by the man usually standing next to her onstage, Bo Diddley.
Having a woman in a rock ‘n’ roll/R&B band who was not simply a back-up singer was unheard of at the time.  The Duchess, originally from Pittsburgh, was said to be Bo’s sister or half-sister, a rumor he started himself, partly because he considered her close enough to qualify as family but also because he didn’t want the other band members to make a move on her. He told his biographer, “Part of the reason I decided to go with that little lie was that it put me in a better position to protect her when we were on the road.”.
The Duchess recorded and toured with Bo for four years and was the band member he entrusted with his money.  She sang back-up with the Bo-dettes (then comprised of Gloria Morgan and Lily Jamieson, a.k.a. “Bee Bee”), managing simultaneously to sing with them, play rhythm guitar, and not miss a single dance move.  The Duchess appeared on several of Bo’s albums, recorded for Leonard Chess’s Checkers label, such as Bo Diddley, Bo Diddley and Company, Bo Diddley’s Beach Party (a live album recorded at the Beach Club in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina), Hey! Good Lookin’, 500% More Man, and The Originator.


The Duchess left Bo Diddley’s band in 1966 to get married and raise a family in Florida. The Duchess showed up at a Bo Diddley concert to say hello to her old friend in July 2004 in California, where she was then living. She died the following year in Fontana, California. (via)
vintagegal:


Bo Diddley & The Duchess (AKA Norma-Jean Wofford)
One of the first female rock ‘n’ roll guitarists was a tall, stunning black woman with a towering bouffant hairdo, a skintight gold lame dress (or black leather pants), high heels, and a custom Gretsch electric guitar, designed by the man usually standing next to her onstage, Bo Diddley.
Having a woman in a rock ‘n’ roll/R&B band who was not simply a back-up singer was unheard of at the time.  The Duchess, originally from Pittsburgh, was said to be Bo’s sister or half-sister, a rumor he started himself, partly because he considered her close enough to qualify as family but also because he didn’t want the other band members to make a move on her. He told his biographer, “Part of the reason I decided to go with that little lie was that it put me in a better position to protect her when we were on the road.”.
The Duchess recorded and toured with Bo for four years and was the band member he entrusted with his money.  She sang back-up with the Bo-dettes (then comprised of Gloria Morgan and Lily Jamieson, a.k.a. “Bee Bee”), managing simultaneously to sing with them, play rhythm guitar, and not miss a single dance move.  The Duchess appeared on several of Bo’s albums, recorded for Leonard Chess’s Checkers label, such as Bo Diddley, Bo Diddley and Company, Bo Diddley’s Beach Party (a live album recorded at the Beach Club in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina), Hey! Good Lookin’, 500% More Man, and The Originator.


The Duchess left Bo Diddley’s band in 1966 to get married and raise a family in Florida. The Duchess showed up at a Bo Diddley concert to say hello to her old friend in July 2004 in California, where she was then living. She died the following year in Fontana, California. (via)
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cootercakes:

queeen
cootercakes:

queeen
cootercakes:

queeen
cootercakes:

queeen
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sopranomonroe:

Pictures from Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life.
sopranomonroe:

Pictures from Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life.
sopranomonroe:

Pictures from Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life.
sopranomonroe:

Pictures from Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life.
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#NW all day, everyday! #pacificnw #oregon #washington #evergreen #503to206 #lovebothmycities
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blogdanirt:

Grace Slick
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vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved
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blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
blackfashion:

Solange Knowles photographed by Seiji Fujimori for The Ground Magazine’s fourth issue styled by Nick Nelson.
Hair : Chuck Amos for Oribe at Jump management Make-up : Munemi Imai at Magnet Agency Set Design : Davis Davis
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Summer loving happened so fast…
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fyblackwomenart:

Ms. Shana Elmsford by theCHAMBA**Jem and the Holograms is being made into a live action movie! Who do you think should play the part of Shana Elmsford?? Would you like to be in the movie? If so go here and upload a photo or video to be considered!

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